Google

Pledge Here to Hire Displaced Insurance Industry Workers

Written on:June 5, 2009
Comments
Add One

When the health insurance industry is dismantled, many people will be out of jobs.  Some have expressed humanitarian concern for those displaced workers and their families.  (Did the buggy whip industry have such vocal humantiarian supporters?)

Of course in a reformed health financing system with universal coverage, unlike workers who lose their jobs now, those displaced workers will not have to worry about losing health insurance coverage for themselves or their families.

Concern for displaced insurance industry workers is often raised by those who favor an unregulated “free market” health insurance industry, i.e., more of the same, to raise fears and prevent change.  Often these concerns are raised in the same breath as fears that a reformed, universal coverage system would bankrupt the country and simply could not, or — on a moralistic basis — should not cover “illegals.”  Concern about covering “illegals” of course is code for “Send them back to where they came from.”

Rate the Insurer proposes to solve all these problems at the same time.  Here is what you can do.

(1) Take the pledge here now to hire a displaced insurance industry worker.

(2) When displaced industry workers are hired into many of the jobs currently taken by “illegals,” people who have come here to work will find they are unable to, and will go home.

  • Costs of covering “illegals” in our reformed, universal health care system is thereby neatly prevented.
  • Humanitarian support is provided to displaced insurance industry workers by giving them jobs that actually matter.

Let me begin.

I am pledging here now to hire Karen Ignani when she is displaced from her job in the health insurance industry.  She currently is president and CEO of America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), the trade association representing the nation’s health maintenance organizations.

She may well be smart enough to be the receptionist in my practice, though I would of course have to assess that.   Of course in the reformed system with universal coverage, as a small business owner and operator, I would be able to provide her with health care benefits.  Or perhaps she could sign up for the public option.

In addition, though I would not be able to pay her at the bloated level she currently enjoys, I would commit to paying her at a level commensurate with what a doctoral level psychologist enjoys under managed care reimbursement.  That is not bad at all considering she has a Master’s degree.  Unfortunately for her that would mean pay at levels seen 20 years ago.  But, she would employed!

Of course we’d have to implement pay-for-performance measures in my business whereby we would establish measures of success, goals and progress would have to be documented, perhaps with contacts to my call-in center every three days so on the job to authorize continued payment.  Telephonic authorization unfortunately would not be a guarantee of payment, but would be subject to the terms of the employment agreement in effect at the time as determined by my consulting employment management company.  (I hear Ingenix is getting into that business).

Alternately, I would commit to allow her to mow my lawn twice a week and shovel the snow any time we have a snowfall greater than 2 inches.  Not a bad deal in Madison, WI.

So, won’t you please join me in pledging to hire a displaced insurance industry worker?   Give a job to an unemployed, legal American.  You can be a great American, help your country solve two problems at the same time, AND obtain cost-effective, performance-based labor in your own business.

Please comment below to enter the name of a displaced insurance industry worker, the potential work you might have available, and an estimate of pay.  You may also pledge to hire an unnamed displaced insurance industry worker.  Thank you for your humanitarian concern for displaced health insurance industry workers and your patriotic support for solving our health care financing crisis.

Share

Leave a Comment